The origins of Easter Eggs…

Divine Advertising, Easter-09 02

In the UK and Europe, the first Easter eggs were dyed, painted and decorated hen, duck or goose eggs, this is still carried on in parts of the world today but you cannot eat them. As time went by, artificial eggs were made and by the end of the 17th century, manufactured eggs were available for purchase at Easter, for giving as Easter gifts and presents.

Easter eggs continued to evolve through the 18th and into the 19th Century, with hollow cardboard Easter eggs filled with Easter gifts and decorated, culminating with the fabulous Faberge Eggs. Encrusted with jewels, they were made for the Czar’s of Russia by Carl Faberge, a French jeweller. Surely these were the ‘ultimate’ Easter gift to buy even a tiny one now would set you back several millions pounds.

It was in the early 1800’s that the first chocolate Easter egg appeared in Germany and France and soon spread to the rest of Europe and beyond. The first chocolate eggs were solid soon followed by hollow eggs. Although making hollow eggs at that time was no mean feat, because the easily worked chocolate we use today didn’t exist then, they had to use a paste made from ground roasted Cacao beans. By the turn of the 19th Century, the discovery of the modern chocolate making process and improved mass manufacturing methods meant that the Chocolate Easter Egg was fast becoming the Easter Gift of choice in the UK and parts of Europe, and by the 1960’s it was well established worldwide.

Now that you’re a eggspert check out the Divine Easter advertising for 2009 (below), then go and try a Divine Easter Egg for yourself…..

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